Contact

Stockert, Oliver
Oliver Stockert
Group leader
Phone: +49 351 4646-2207
Fax: +49 351 4646-3232
Room: B3.4.27

Research groups

Neutron spectroscopy

(left) Magnetic response  in the normal state (black) and superconducting state (red) of CeCu2Si2. A spin excitation gap opens in the superconducting state of CeCu2Si2. 
(right) Inverse lifetime of the spin fluctuations  versus temperature in the normal state of CeCu2Si2. With decreasing  tempeature the lifetime almost diverges as expected near a QCP. Zoom Image

(left) Magnetic response  in the normal state (black) and superconducting state (red) of CeCu2Si2. A spin excitation gap opens in the superconducting state of CeCu2Si2

(right) Inverse lifetime of the spin fluctuations  versus temperature in the normal state of CeCu2Si2. With decreasing  tempeature the lifetime almost diverges as expected near a QCP.

The nature of the magnetically ordered state and the spin dynamics are at the origin for an understanding of magnetic quantum critical points. Here, neutron scattering as a microscopic probe can give important information on an atomic scale about the magnetic order, the characteristic energy scales of the magnetic interactions and the spin fluctuations close to quantum criticality. The magnetic structure, the critical spin dynamics and its dimensionality directly affect the unusual behavior seen in thermodynamics and transport properties of these compounds. Neutron scattering can also shed light on to the pairing mechanism of unconventional superconductors since spin excitations are a driving force for the Cooper pair formation in these unconventional superconductors. In our research we mainly focus on lanthanide and actinide-based heavy-fermion compounds located near a magnetic instability and study their magnetic ordering phenomena and magnetic excitation spectra in dependence of temperature, external magnetic field, composition and external pressure. Experiments are performed at all major European neutron sources at temperatures down to well below 100 mK and in external magnetic fields in excess of 12 T.

 
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