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Promotion in der IMPRS-CPQM

The International Max Planck Research School for Chemistry and Physics of Quantum Materials offers a highly attractive overall package of PhD level research on materials chemistry and physics.

Learn more on the IMPRS-CPQM webpage.

Workshops/Konferenzen

Vorträge

Willkommen am Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

Unsere Mission: Spitzenforschung auf dem Gebiet der Materialwissenschaften - fachübergreifend zwischen Festkörperchemie und Physik der kondensierten Materie.

Chemie und Physik – ein starkes Team!

Unsere Mission: Spitzenforschung auf dem Gebiet der Materialwissenschaften - fachübergreifend zwischen Festkörperchemie und Physik der kondensierten Materie. [mehr]

URu2Si2 undergoes a mysterious ordering transition at 17 K which challenges theoretical and experimental physicists since more than thirty years. By now is generally understood that the distribution of the uranium electron density plays a key role, however, measuring these has so far not been possible. Recently, scientists from MPI-CPfS, University of Cologne and Van-der-Waals-Zeeman Institute in Amsterdam were able to measure these charge distributions by means of inelastic x-ray scattering. 

Pressemeldung: Hidden order and 5f electron density

23. November 2016

URu2Si2 undergoes a mysterious ordering transition at 17 K which challenges theoretical and experimental physicists since more than thirty years. By now is generally understood that the distribution of the uranium electron density plays a key role, however, measuring these has so far not been possible. Recently, scientists from MPI-CPfS, University of Cologne and Van-der-Waals-Zeeman Institute in Amsterdam were able to measure these charge distributions by means of inelastic x-ray scattering. 

[mehr]
Im Rahmen der Allianz MaxPlanck@TUM wird sie ihre Forschungsgruppe „Physik unkonventioneller Metalle und Supraleiter“ an unserem Institut weiterführen und ist gleichzeitig Professorin an der TU München.

Dr. Elena Hassinger wurde auf eine Tenure Track Professur an die Technische Universität München (TUM) berufen.

23. November 2016

Im Rahmen der Allianz MaxPlanck@TUM wird sie ihre Forschungsgruppe „Physik unkonventioneller Metalle und Supraleiter“ an unserem Institut weiterführen und ist gleichzeitig Professorin an der TU München. [mehr]
The solid state chemistry (SSC) department of MPI-CPfS takes part in the speedCIGS project which its main aims is to speed up the manufacturing process of solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS). The project is funded by Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. MPI-CPfS collaborates in this project by performing computer simulation to support the experimental findings of other partners from industry and research institutes.

MPI-CPfS participates in the speedCIGS project funded by BMWi

17. November 2016

The solid state chemistry (SSC) department of MPI-CPfS takes part in the speedCIGS project which its main aims is to speed up the manufacturing process of solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS). The project is funded by Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. MPI-CPfS collaborates in this project by performing computer simulation to support the experimental findings of other partners from industry and research institutes.

[mehr]
The growth process of polar interfaces of oxide materials in general is a mystery. Recently, MPI CPfS scientists, in collaboration with University of Cologne, Hiroshima University, ESRF, and NSRRC, make a paradigm shift in understanding how polar interfaces can grow. An unexpected but elegant growth principle is developed, namely ‘dynamic atomic reconstruction’, in which atoms rearrange themselves during the deposition such that a well ordered and smooth interface is formed, despite the destabilizing forces due to the catastrophic electrostatic potential.

Pressemeldung: Dynamic atomic reconstruction: how Fe3O4 thin films evade polar catastrophe for epitaxy

18. Oktober 2016

The growth process of polar interfaces of oxide materials in general is a mystery. Recently, MPI CPfS scientists, in collaboration with University of Cologne, Hiroshima University, ESRF, and NSRRC, make a paradigm shift in understanding how polar interfaces can grow. An unexpected but elegant growth principle is developed, namely ‘dynamic atomic reconstruction’, in which atoms rearrange themselves during the deposition such that a well ordered and smooth interface is formed, despite the destabilizing forces due to the catastrophic electrostatic potential.

[mehr]
A molecular magnet is expected to be a feasible material for building devices like quantum computers. As a result of a weak magnetic interaction between the molecules, it lacks collective magnetic properties of a common magnet, but the intra-molecular magnetic interaction gives rise to irreversible quantum magnetism, macroscopic quantum tunneling, and novel phenomena unique to the mesoscopic world.

Press Release: A molecular quantum magnet realized in an inorganic solid

12. Oktober 2016

A molecular magnet is expected to be a feasible material for building devices like quantum computers. As a result of a weak magnetic interaction between the molecules, it lacks collective magnetic properties of a common magnet, but the intra-molecular magnetic interaction gives rise to irreversible quantum magnetism, macroscopic quantum tunneling, and novel phenomena unique to the mesoscopic world.

[mehr]
Dr. Julie Karel (Solid State Chemistry Department) has accepted a tenure-track position in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, commencing November 2016.

Julie Karel leaving for Monash University

26. September 2016

Dr. Julie Karel (Solid State Chemistry Department) has accepted a tenure-track position in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, commencing November 2016.
The room temperature multiferroic material BiFeO3 is highly expected for the design and development of technological devices with novel functionalities. However, the multi-domain nature of the material tends to nullify the properties  of  interest  and  complicates  the  thorough understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for those properties. Recently, MPI CPfS scientists demonstrated the realization of a BiFeO3 material in thin film form with single-domain behavior in both its magnetism and ferroelectricity.

Pressemeldung: Single-domain multiferroic BiFeO3 films

21. September 2016

The room temperature multiferroic material BiFeO3 is highly expected for the design and development of technological devices with novel functionalities. However, the multi-domain nature of the material tends to nullify the properties  of  interest  and  complicates  the  thorough understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for those properties. Recently, MPI CPfS scientists demonstrated the realization of a BiFeO3 material in thin film form with single-domain behavior in both its magnetism and ferroelectricity. [mehr]
Professor Parkin and his group, in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, the Technical University in Chemnitz and the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan, discovered that highly conducting transparent oxide films can be formed by electrolyte gating thin films of tungsten oxide, WO3, that are insulating as initially prepared.

Pressemeldung: Transparent Conducting Oxide Induced by Liquid Electrolyte Gating

20. September 2016

Professor Parkin and his group, in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, the Technical University in Chemnitz and the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan, discovered that highly conducting transparent oxide films can be formed by electrolyte gating thin films of tungsten oxide, WO3, that are insulating as initially prepared. [mehr]
In a recent study, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden demonstrated a non-collinear antiferromagnetism in a tetragonal Heusler compound Pt2MnGa with a high ordering temperature making room temperature applications feasible.

Pressemeldung: Room-temperature tetragonal non-collinear Heusler antiferromagnet Pt2MnGa

13. September 2016

In a recent study, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden demonstrated a non-collinear antiferromagnetism in a tetragonal Heusler compound Pt2MnGa with a high ordering temperature making room temperature applications feasible.

[mehr]

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